Sibling Rivalry Evidence from Ghana

Sibling Rivalry: Evidence from Ghana As in many other low-income economies, parents in Ghana often invest less in the human capital of their daughters than their sons. Primary school enrollments are fairly even, but by secondary school only 28% of females between age 16 and 23 attend school, whereas 42% of boys are enrolled. A… Continue reading Sibling Rivalry Evidence from Ghana

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 The adjustment of birth rates

 The adjustment of birth rates Macro- and micro-inertia The preceding story of the demographic transition relies on an enormously important feature—the well-documented failure of the birth rate to instantly chase the death rate downward. Recall from the previous section that the main impetus to the rise in population growth rates comes from the fact that… Continue reading  The adjustment of birth rates

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Income improvements and fertility

Income improvements and fertility. Consider, first, the total potential income of the couple if they were to have no children at all. Income may be wage labor or some other form of income, such as land rent. If it is the former, potential income includes all income earned by each spouse, under the scenario that… Continue reading Income improvements and fertility

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Social Norms and a New Fertility Decline

Social Norms and a New Fertility Decline10 According to the 1994 revision of the official United Nations world population estimates and projections, a fertility transition is underway in several sub-Saharan African and South-Central Asian countries. Fertility levels have traditionally been very high in these countries. Total fertility rates have declined in Madagascar (from 6.6 in… Continue reading Social Norms and a New Fertility Decline

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